October 19-21, 2016

Dr. Festoff, PHLOGISTIX founder, presented a paper and poster entitled “Clinical biomarkers of blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and progression to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease” at The Lancet Neurology Conference Preclinical neurodegenerative disease: towards prevention and early diagnosis

August 2016

PHLOGISTIX Founder, Dr. Festoff, published a paper in the August 2016 issue of the Journal of Neuroinflammation with colleagues Drs. Luca Cucullo and Ravi Sajji of the Texas Tech University Heath Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Pharmacy at Amarillo, TX. The article was the result of work by PHLOGISTIX and the Blood Brain Research Center of TTUHSC, in association with KUMC,showing clear evidence that damage-associated molecules (DAMPs), amyloid beta peptide (A) and high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), are elevated in the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) continuum. This suggest their potential use as biomarkers in preclinical AD diagnosis in at-risk populations. These would include genetics-at–risk, age-at- risk and head injury-at-risk cohorts.

Since publication, the web-based Altmetrics, a metrics and qualitative database complementary to traditional, citation-based metrics has scored this article https://www.altmetric.com/details/10815432#score Compared to these this article has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it’s in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.

Article published

The Founder, Dr. Festoff, published a paper in the August 2016 issue of the Journal of Neuroinflammation with colleagues Drs. Luca Cucullo and Ravi Sajji of the Texas Tech University Heath Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Pharmacy at Amarillo, TX, and Patrick van Dreden of Diagnostica Stago, Gennevilliers, France. The article was the result of work by PHLOGISTIX and the Blood Brain Research Center of TTUHSC, in association with the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC), that showed clear evidence that damage-associated molecules (DAMPs), amyloid beta peptide (Ab) and high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), are elevated in the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) continuum suggesting their potential use as biomarkers in pre-clinical AD diagnosis in at-risk populations (J. Neuroinflammation, 2016 Aug 24;13(1):194. doi: 10.1186/s12974-016-0670-z). These would include genetics-at–risk, age-at-risk and head injury-at-risk cohorts. [Read more…]

PHLOGISTIX FOUNDER SPEAKS AT RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

PHLOGISTIX FOUNDER, Dr. Barry Festoff, was Distinguished Speaker at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) at Amarillo Annual Research Days Symposium June 11, 2015. Dr. Festoff gave a lecture entitled “Translational Approaches to Diagnosis and Monitoring of Concussion Leading to Neurodegenerative Diseases”

pHLOGISTIX Founder Gives Talk on Sports-Related Concussion

pHLOGISTIX Founder, Barry Festoff, gave a presentation on June 4, 2013 to the Sports Medicine Concussion Group, Doctors Hospital/ Health System in Miami, Florida. The title of the lecture was Sports-Related Concussion and Development of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Diagnostics, Prevention and Treatment.

 

 

pHLOGISTIX to Partner with Innovative Technology Development Foundation

Innovative Technology Development Foundation (ITDF), a not for profit 501(c)3 public charity, was organized to work alongside pHLOGISTIX LLC for TBI and neurodegenerative disorders.

pHLOGISTIX Turns Focus Toward Companion Diagnostics (CDx)

In late 2011, pHLOGISTIX made a business decision to incorporate companion diagnostics (CDx), a growing trend in the pharmaceutical industry because of the emphasis on personalized medicine, into its business strategy. The basis for this was the growing public awareness of the impact of concussion in everyday life.

Kansas Bioscience Authority – Kansas City Star

KU Cancer Center among recipients of $6 million in grants, investments

More than $6 million in taxpayer dollars, routed through the Kansas Bioscience Authority, were promised Monday to the University of Kansas Cancer Center and a handful of small companies.

The money, some of it investments, some of it simply grants, comes as part of the authority’s ongoing efforts to stimulate the bioscience industry in the state. The money comes from increased tax revenues to the state attributed to biosciences.

Among the awards, the largest was a grant of $2.3 million to Heartland Plant Innovations to fund its operations next year and support programs such as plant breeding.

The other KBA allotments included:

•A $1.6 million grant to Dicephera Pharmaceuticals to work with three other companies to advance its drug development programs. The company designs a cancer drug.

•A $1.1 million grant to the cancer center to recruit physician Raymond Perez as part of an ongoing effort to win a designation as a National Cancer Institute. Perez comes from Dartmouth Medical School and will be a leader at the center’s drug discovery and delivery program.

•A $600,000 equity investment in Novita Therapeutics for development of an implantable cardiovascular device intended to treat an unspecified chronic condition.

•A $400,000 grant to an unnamed company — the authority said the name was being kept quiet for competitive reasons — to help start a research and development laboratory in the state working in animal health.

•A $140,000 grant to Green Dot Holdings, based in Cottonwood Falls, for a research collaboration with the Kansas Polymer Research Center at Pittsburg State University to study a bioplastic and evaluate the use of alternative feed stocks.

•A $98,890 grant to Lenexa-based Phlogistix for research and development of a protein that plays a role in controlling inflammation.